This will surely come as no surprise to humans given the circumstances. The rabbits however seem a bit surprised and disappointed at the lack of extra treats from visitors and volunteers. Fortunately it hasn’t had much more of an impact than that on them as of yet. It is likely that sourcing vegetables for them is going to get more difficult as restrictions on quantities mean that I can no longer simply add theirs to my online shop as I have done for the last few weeks. Of course if we run out completely I can always go out and pick them grass.  As long as the hay and feed deliveries continue we will be fine. Unless I get badly ill of course, and as I have asthma I am in the higher risk group. These are difficult times indeed. It is rather surreal living in a rabbit sanctuary while the world outside changes so rapidly so forgive me if I waffle on a bit…

There has been a small but significant change within the sanctuary too. Our dear old chief rabbit Nutbrown finally left us shortly before his fourteenth birthday. He had been here since the year we opened and had provided continuity as an ever present character. We didn’t actually see much of him for the first few years as being half wild (his mother escaped temporarily to have a fling with a handsome wild buck)he and his sisters were very nervous. They were almost impossible to handle and very good at escaping which meant managing them was always a challenge. After six or so years they stopped vanishing down their burrows whenever we walked past but not until this year did Nutbown come to tolerate being handled as he needed daily pain relief for his arthritis and regular grooming as he could no longer do it himself. He even got to the point that he would lick me! It was quite an honor to be accepted like that! He had been blind since he was eight or nine but he got around well enough right until the end although his legs became weak and twisted and awkward, sheer strength of character kept him going, that, a great love of food, and the support of his companions who clearly loved and respected him. He was always in pride of place in the centre of the bunny heap, nice and toasty warm even on the coldest mornings and received lots of grooming, particularly from Dachs who had been with him for many years. He had a long and happy life and I am pleased to have been able to give it to him with the help of you, our supporters. I hope that even with what is going on in the world we will be able to still care about the small but valuable things in life that places like this represent, that our modern lifestyle has enabled.

Stay safe and strong. We can get through this together.